On September 9, 2018 Swedes hit the polls to elect their next government. But almost three months later Swedish lawmakers have not managed to agree on a coalition after the election results ended without majority for any of the traditional coalitions. Mainstream parties from the left- and centre-right blocs have also seemed at a loss over how to handle a political landscape disrupted by the rise of far-right Sweden Democrats (SD).

This year’s election is one of the most complicated in Sweden’s history, after Social Democrats leader and prime minister Stefan Löfven’s centre-left alliance won 144 seats in September’s election, only one more than the centre-right opposition.

Anti-immigration party Sweden Democrats won 17.5 percent of the votes, more than doubling their seats in parliament.

This makes the right-wingers the third largest party in Sweden with 62 out of in total 349 seats in the Swedish parliament.

One of the biggest issues Swedish lawmakers are facing now is that none of the mainstream parties wish to join forces with the hard-right SD party, who have their roots in a neo-Nazi movement from the 1980s.

And neither “seat warmer” prime minister Stefan Löfven (Social Democrats) or Moderate party leader Ulf Kristersson have succeeded in obtaining majority for a new government.

This means a new election may soon be on the agenda.

But first, the Parliamentary Speaker, Andreas Norlen has given Mr Löfven more time to find a solution.

The deadline for the current prime minister to find a solution has been set to Friday, December 7.

Mr Löfven said of the date: ”It is a well-balanced date that the speaker made and it is good that we have pressure on us.”

After the election Mr Löfven was removed after he lost a vote of confidence in the Swedish parliament, but has remained the functioning head of state until Sweden agrees on a permanent solution.

But lawmakers have also rejected opposition Alliance leader Ulf Kristersson as Sweden’s next prime minister.

And leader of the Centre party, Annie Lööf, whose party is normally part of the Alliance, has now offered to support Mr Löfven if he agrees to cut taxes and free up business regulations.

The Swedish parliament will then vote for a second time on Löfven as prime minister, a vote that most likely will take place next week.

If there are four unsuccessful attempts to form a government, it will trigger a fresh election – something which has never happened before in the history of Swedish politics.

But a poll published Tuesday, December 5 show Swedes would deliver another hung parliament if an election were held today.

The poll, conducted by the Statistics Office on 4,721 voters between October 29 and November 27, is heaping pressure even further on the mainstream parties to break the deadlock that has left the country without a government since September’s vote.